"Jazz-Hands—Jack 2000!"

This Is Your Brain On Jazz:

ScienceDaily (Feb. 28, 2008) — A pair of Johns Hopkins and government scientists have discovered that when jazz musicians improvise, their brains turn off areas linked to self-censoring and inhibition, and turn on those that let self-expression flow.

It appears, they conclude, that jazz musicians create their unique improvised riffs by turning off inhibition and turning up creativity. The scientists from the University’s School of Medicine and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders describe their curiosity about the possible neurological underpinnings of the almost trance-like state jazz artists enter during spontaneous improvisation.

“When jazz musicians improvise, they often play with eyes closed in a distinctive, personal style that transcends traditional rules of melody and rhythm,” says Charles J. Limb, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and a trained jazz saxophonist himself. “It’s a remarkable frame of mind,” he adds, “during which, all of a sudden, the musician is generating music that has never been heard, thought, practiced or played before. What comes out is completely spontaneous.”

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Posted on March 4, 2008, in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I really like this idea – the state of mind of the jazz musician when improvising must be a fascinating place to be.

  1. Pingback: Jazz really does free your mind « thejazzbreakfast

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